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pdf FOOD AND AGRICULTURE: MOVING FORWARD ON FOOD LOSS AND WASTE REDUCTION Popular

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FOOD AND AGRICULTURE: MOVING FORWARD ON FOOD LOSS AND WASTE REDUCTION

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

FOOD LOSS AND WASTE – FRAMING THE ISSUES TO FACILITATE ACTION

Reducing food loss and waste is widely seen as an important way to reduce production costs and increase the efficiency of the food system, improve food security and nutrition, and contribute towards environmental sustainability. Growing attention to food loss and waste is reflected in the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). SDG Target 12.3 calls for halving per capita global food waste at the retail and consumer levels and reducing food loss along production and supply chains (including post-harvest losses) by 2030. Reducing food loss and waste also has the potential to contribute to other SDGs, including the Zero Hunger goal (SDG 2), which calls for an end to hunger, the achievement of food security and improved nutrition, and the promotion of sustainable agriculture. The expected positive environmental impacts from reducing food loss and waste would also affect, among others, SDG 6 (sustainable water management), SDG 13 (climate change), SDG 14 (marine resources), SDG 15 (terrestrial ecosystems, forestry, biodiversity), and many other SDGs.

While the reduction of food loss and waste appears as a clear and desirable objective, actual implementation is not simple and its complete elimination may not be realistic. This report acknowledges the need to reduce food loss
and waste, presents new insights on what is known and what is not, and provides guidance on how to target interventions and policies depending on policymakers’ objectives and the information available. Deciding on concrete actions, interventions or policies to reduce food loss and waste requires answers to a number of questions: In which locations and stages of the supply chain is food lost or wasted and to what extent? Why does food loss and waste occur? How can it be reduced? What are the costs involved? And, ultimately, who benefits from reducing food loss and waste, and who loses? 

Responding to all these questions will require access to proper information.

When considering actions and policy options, the report argues that food loss and waste reduction should be seen as a way to achieve other objectives, notably improved efficiency in the food system, improved food security and nutrition, and improved environmental sustainability. How policymakers prioritize these different dimensions, and the information available on how food loss and waste affects them, will shape the most appropriate mix of interventions and policies to reduce food loss and waste.

Download the Report to know more.

Source: FAO

Related to SDG 12: Responsible consumption and production

pdf KEY INDICATORS FOR ASIA AND THE PACIFIC 2019 Popular

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KeyIndicators2019.pdf

KEY INDICATORS FOR ASIA AND THE PACIFIC 2019

Foreword

This edition of Key Indicators for Asia and the Pacific marks 50 years of the flagship statistical publication of the Asian Development Bank (ADB). In July 1969, Key Indicators of Developing Member Countries of ADB was first published as an internal reference document, providing data on each of the 17 developing economies that were ADB members at the time.

Just as we have seen many changes across our region over half a century, Key Indicators for Asia and the Pacific has reflected these changes. Today, the publication contains a comprehensive set of economic, social, and environmental statistics, including indicators of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG). Covering the 49 regional members of ADB,Key Indicators for Asia and the Pacific now reaches out to a broad audience that includes policymakers, development practitioners, government officials, researchers, students, and the general public. Beginning this year, the publication’s vitally important data will also be accessible in a user-friendly digitized format.

Data in this 2019 edition of Key Indicators for Asia and the Pacific—prepared for the first time by ADB’s newly formed Statistics and Data Innovation Unit—show that development across Asia and the Pacific has been impressive on many fronts. The number of people in our region living in extreme poverty declined from 1.1 billion in 2002 to 264 million in 2015. The maternal mortality ratio was halved in the period from 2000 to 2015, and an average of about 90% of children were enrolled in primary school in 2017. The region’s share of global gross domestic product (in current United States dollars) surpassed one-third in 2018, while international trade has become a growing source of regional integration, as economies across Asia and the Pacific strengthen, broaden, and diversify their participation in global value chains.

While the region has done remarkably well, the indicators presented here also remind us of the many challenges that lie ahead. Economic growth throughout Asia and the Pacific has generally been accompanied by a rise in carbon dioxide emissions; cities are affected by air pollution; and, in some economies, more than half the urban population is living in slums or informal settlements. The proportion of elderly people in the total population reached an average of 8.6% across all ADB regional members in 2018, while the number of women participating in national parliaments is below gender parity. The SDG indicators highlight the need to expand access to safe water and sanitation facilities, and to ensure that all people have safe, nutritious, and sufficient food to eat all year round.

Effective governance depends on accurate and timely data to support evidence-based policymaking. This requires investment in data development and statistical capacity building. The special supplement to Key Indicators for Asia and the Pacific 2019 presents results from one such capacity-building initiative by ADB. It provides a quantitative assessment of the benefits of using handheld digital devices for survey data collection and management, with the traditional pen and paper interviewing method as a basis for comparison.

In the 50th year of this publication, ADB again acknowledges the ongoing relationships with statistical partners in our regional member economies, who provide us with the most recent data from their official sources. We are also indebted to those international agencies from which the data in many of the publication’s tables are sourced. We hope that Key Indicators for Asia and the Pacific will remain a valuable resource for data on major development issues well into the future. As always, we welcome feedback from our users on both the content and structure of the publication.

Takehiko Nakao

President Asian Development Bank

To know more, download the Report

Source: ADB

 

pdf Report of the Special Rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples 2018 Popular

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2018-annual-a-hrc-39-17-en.pdf

Report of the Special Rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples 2018

In the report the Special Rapporteur briefly refers to the activities undertaken since the submission of her last report, provides a thematic study on attacks against and the criminalization of indigenous human rights defenders and reflects on available prevention and protection measures. She concludes with recommendations on how various stakeholders can prevent violations and improve protection.

Image IPMG events on webcast at HLPF 2018 Popular

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HLPF Live Final 20180708.png

document Right Energy Partnership Brief_Spanish Popular

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Brief on REP_25April_ES Trans_Tamayo.doc

document Right Energy Partnership Brief Popular

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Brief on REP_25April.doc

document Right Energy Partnership Member Form for Indigenous Peoples Groups Popular

630 downloads

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REP_IP Membership Form-JC.docx

This is the membership form for the Right Energy Partnership.

pdf DETAILED EVENTS OF THE IPMG GLF Popular

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DETAILED EVENTS OF THE IPMG-GLF.pdf

pdf COP23 SDG 2 RT 3 Programme Climate resilient landscapes Popular

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COP23 SDG 2 RT 3 Programme - Climate-resilient landscapes.pdf

pdf SideEvent 21Sept2017 Background&Agenda Popular

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SideEvent_21Sept2017_Background&Agenda.pdf

PROTECTING THE RIGHTS OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLES: TAKING UP THE CHALLENGE IN THE CONTEXT OF THE 2030 AGENDA

KEYNOTE SPEECHES BY H.E. SVEN MIKSER, MINISTER OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS OF ESTONIA,

H.E. NEVEN MIMICA, EU COMMISSIONER,

& H.E. ELINA KALKKU, UNDER-SECRETARY OF STATE OF MINISTRY OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS OF FINLAND

Thursday 21st September 2017 · 11.00am · 12.30pm Room C · UN Headquarters New York

Followed by a reception and a cultural performance by indigenous artists at the ONE UN HOTEL 1.00 to 2.30pm

pdf Press Release SDG Media Panel “The 2030 Agenda – an opportunity or threat for indigenous peoples’ rights?” Popular

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UNGA_Panel_Final.pdf

“The 2030 Agenda – an opportunity or threat for indigenous peoples’ rights?”

PANEL DEBATE 21/09/2017 16- 16,20 SDG MEDIA ZONE, United Nations, NY

While this year marks the 10th anniversary of the adoption of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) by the UN General Assembly, indigenous peoples around the globe still face a huge implementation gap of their rights. At the same time, international agreements, particularly the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development is yet to be fully aligned with the commitments of States to respect and protect the collective rights of indigenous peoples with clear policies, measures, and programmes to implement the SDGs.

pdf CONCEPT NOTE UNGA 72 Indigenous Peoples side event Popular

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CONCEPT NOTE - UNGA 72 Indigenous Peoples side event.pdf

High-level side event

"Protecting the Rights of Indigenous Peoples:  Taking up the challenge in the context of the 2030 Agenda" on the margins of the 72nd Session of the United Nations General Assembly

hosted by the Government of the Republic of Estonia in cooperation with the European Commission, the International Labour Organization, the Indigenous Peoples Major Group for SDGs and Partners

21 September 2017

11.00 to 12.30am, UN Headquarters New York, Room C

 

pdf Indigenous Voices At The High Level Political Forum 2017 - Program Popular

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Programme_Indigenous Voices at the HLPF_2017_July 17.pdf

“Indigenous Voices at the HLPF” is a one-day space for indigenous media to cover the High-Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development 2017 through indigenous worldviews, perspectives and languages. Indigenous journalists and speakers will broadcast information about the six Sustainable Development Goals under review in 2017, the outcomes of the Voluntary National Reviews and the 2017 HLPF Theme: “Eradicating poverty and promoting prosperity in a changing world".

Highlights from the Programme:

  • 6 SDG reflection sessions: indigenous speakers will analyse the 6 SDGs under review in 2017
  • 4 panels: indigenous perspectives on the 2030 Agenda, the 2017 theme and progress so far
  • Individual interviews: indigenous participants will interview their governments on the experience of the 2017 Voluntary National Reviews
  • Indigenous story tellers will tell inspiring stories from their ancestors about Mother Earth

pdf A Human Rights-Based Approach to Eradicating Poverty and Promoting Prosperity in a Changing World Popular

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HuRi-SDG event HLPF -invite.pdf

The 2030 Agenda explicitly states that the Sustainable Development Goals “seek to realize human rights for all and to achieve gender equality”. Further, the Agenda pledges to “leave no one behind”, and to “reach those furthest behind first”.

The 2017 High Level Political Forum will review SDG 1 (no poverty), SDG 2 (zero hunger), SDG 5 (gender equality), and SDG 17 (partnerships), among others. These goals are underpinned by key human rights instruments and international labour standards, and reflect fundamental human rights principles of equality and non-­‐discrimination.

The achievement of these SDGs and the realisation of human rights are tied together in a mutually reinforcing way that allows for integrated strategies and approaches to, for example, reducing poverty and ensuring food security, while realising the rights of indigenous peoples and persons with disabilities. Further, human rights principles regarding participation and accountability, as well as instruments such as the UN Guiding Principles for Business and Human Rights constitute essential tools for designing the processes and partnerships needed to reach the goals.

pdf Overcoming Poverty: Indigenous Concepts of Well-being and Development Popular

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Side Event Flyer_Overcoming Poverty for All_Indigenous Concepts of Well-being and Development_12 July 2[573].pdf

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development provides a new opportunity to advance the rights and well-being of indigenous peoples, who were largely invisible in the Millennium Development Goals.

Indigenous peoples have engaged actively in the first years of the implementation of the 2030 Agenda. They have called for participation, disaggregated data according to indigenous identity and inclusion of their rights in national action plans, follow-up and review. They contributed actively to implementation and shared their traditional knowledge and development approaches as inspiration for the 2030 Agenda.

Indigenous peoples’ concepts of holistic and multidimensional well-being can bring valuable inspiration to the High Level Political Forum 2017, in particular the theme of promoting prosperity and eradicating poverty: What does it in fact mean to be poor or not? Which structural factors contribute to keeping indigenous peoples excluded, marginalised and poor? What are the particular challenges for indigenous women to move out of poverty? How can indigenous peoples’ traditional livelihoods provide a sustainable alternative to present models of resource extraction and profit-driven businesses? What is the key to not leaving indigenous peoples behind?

pdf Human Rights and Sustainable Development: A learning, training and practice session Popular

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A5_LearningTrainingPracticeSessionJuly14_Digital.pdf

Sustainable development and human rights are interlinked.

One cannot be achieved without the other.

Our session focuses on the human rights-based approach to eradicating poverty and promoting prosperity.

pdf Concept Note for Indigenous Voices at the HLPF 2017 Popular

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Concept note for Indigenous Voices at the HLPF 2017.pdf

The “Indigenous Voices” will cover the High Level Political Forum 2017 through indigenous worldviews, perspectives and languages. Indigenous journalists and speakers will broadcast information about the six specific Sustainable Development Goals under review in 2017, about the outcomes of the Voluntary National Reviews and about the 2017 HLPF Theme: “Eradicating poverty and promoting prosperity in a changing world."

pdf Avances en la implementación de la Agenda de los ODS e implicaciones para los Pueblos Indígenas de Guatemala Popular

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Artículo ODS Patricia Burrion.pdf

En el marco del pos grado para optar el título de Experta en Pueblos Indígenas, Derechos Humanos y Cooperación Internacional, a continuación encontrará un artículo acerca del tema: “Avances en la implementación de la agenda de los objetivos de desarrollo sostenible 2030 e implicaciones para los pueblos indígenas de Guatemala”.

En el año 2000, la minoría más grande del mundo, los pueblos indígenas, no tuvieron el reconocimiento necesario e inclusión en los Objetivos de Desarrollo del Milenio. La Agenda 2030 que contiene los Objetivos de Desarrollo Sostenible y constituyen la segunda fase de la estrategia de desarrollo impulsada por las Naciones Unidas desde el año 2000, ve más allá de los ODM, ya que, se propone abordar las causas estructurales de la pobreza en su concepción multidimensional.

Connect with us

IPMG Organizing Partners

Tebtebba
1 Roman Ayson Road, Baguio City 2600, Philippines
Tel. No. +63 74 444-7703 / Tex Fax +63 74 443-9459
Website: www.tebtebba.org
Email: tebtebba@tebtebba.org

International Indian Treaty Council
2940 16th Street, Suite 305, San Francisco, CA 94103, USA
Website: www.iitc.org
Email: info@treatycouncil.org

This initiative is being implemented with funding by the European Union.

 

Indigenous Peoples Major Group for Sustainable Development © Copyright 2020.

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