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pdf #HLPF2019: Session on: Four years of VNRs: what have we learned on implementing the SDGs?

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IPMG Statement on the SDG implementationespanhol.pdf

#HLPF2019: Session on: Four years of VNRs: what have we learned on implementing the SDGs?

High Level Political Forum for Sustainable Development ( 2019)

Session on: Four years of VNRs: what have we learned on implementing the SDGs?

Statement by the Indigenous Peoples Major Group

While we acknowledge efforts of some States to include indigenous peoples in the SDG implementation, these are few and insufficient. The alarming trend is more exclusion and discrimination of indigenous peoples.  The commitment to leaving no one behind is not translated  into clear actions, particularly  in concrete  policies, programmes, and resource allocation and mobilization.

Many of the Voluntary National Reports acknowledge  the groups of those left behind, but do not provide for mechanisms for the meaningful participation and the full inclusion of their needs and priorities. Further, many countries did not even mention indigenous peoples as distinct marginalized groups and  no reference to  their collective rights and contributions to sustainable development. The top-down approach to SDG implementation, the lack of policy coherence, the disconnect between State’s accountability to their human rights obligations, and the strong emphasis on economic growth are some of the key obstacles in reaching those left behind including indigenous peoples. In fact, there is a continuing lack of awareness of the SDGs at the grassroots level including in indigenous territories.

The VNR session of the HLPF is largely superficial and in many cases do not reflect the realities on the ground in relation to persisting inequality, discrimination, gross violation of human rights and lack of access to justice, all of these are critical issues to achieve the SDGs. Further, the participation of CSOs particularly the rights holders are extremely limited; and some States even refused any statement or questions addressed to them by CSOs  in response to their report. This clearly demonstrate the lack of openness and goodwill of States to engage with its own citizens  despite of the SDG commitment to  participation and inclusion. We cannot allow a double standard in the VNR process  that  rejects to even listen to voices of those left behind who want to present the realities on the ground.   We thereby demand the UNGA and the ECOSOC to ensure meaningful participation of civil society, with particular attention to those left behind in the review of the HLPF.

 

Foro político de alto nivel para el desarrollo sostenible (2019)

Sesión sobre: ​​Cuatro años de VNR: ¿qué hemos aprendido sobre la implementación de los ODS?

 

Declaración del Grupo Principal de Pueblos Indígenas.

Si bien reconocemos los esfuerzos de algunos Estados para incluir a los pueblos indígenas en la implementación de los ODS, estos son pocos e insuficientes. La exclusion y la discriminacion de los pueblos indígenas es una tendencia alarmante. El compromiso de no dejar a nadie atrás no se traduce en acciones claras, particularmente en políticas concretas, programas y asignación y movilización de recursos. 

Muchos de los Informes Nacionales Voluntarios reconocen a los grupos de los que se quedan atrás, pero no proporcionan mecanismos para la participación significativa y la plena inclusión de sus necesidades y prioridades. Además, muchos países no contemplan los pueblos indígenas como distintos grupos marginados y sin hacer referencia a sus derechos colectivos ni a sus contribuciones al desarrollo sostenible. El enfoque de arriba hacia abajo para la implementación de los ODS, la falta de coherencia de las políticas, la desconexión entre la responsabilidad del Estado con sus obligaciones de derechos humanos y el fuerte énfasis en el crecimiento económico son algunos de los obstáculos clave para alcanzar a los que se quedan atras, incluidos los pueblos indígenas. De hecho, existe una continua falta de conocimiento de los ODS a nivel de base, incluso en nuestros territorios.

La sesión VNR del HLPF es en gran medida superficial y, en muchos casos, no refleja las realidades en el terreno en relación con la persistencia de la desigualdad, la discriminación, la violación grave de los derechos humanos y la falta de acceso a la justicia. Además, la participación de las Organizaciones de Sociedad Civil, en particular los titulares de derechos, es extremadamente limitada; y algunos estados incluso rechazaron cualquier declaración o pregunta que se  les dirigen, con relacion  a sus informes. Esto demuestra claramente la falta de apertura y buena voluntad de los Estados para comprometerse con sus propios ciudadanos

pdf #HLPF2019: DECLARATION OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLES IPMG STATEMENT ON GOAL 16

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DeclaracionINGLES_MARIO_SDG16_v3 (1).pdf

#HLPF2019: DECLARATION OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLES IPMG STATEMENT ON GOAL 16

DECLARATION OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLES

INDIGENOUS PEOPLES MAJOR GROUP STATEMENT – GOAL 16 (Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions

I am Mario Nicacio, from the Wapichana indigenous people of the Brazilian Amazonia, I represent 305 indigenous peoples and 274 Brazilian languages. We live in 13% of the Brazilian territory. The current policy of the Bolsonaro government has a clear focus on the violation of our collective rights. 

That is why we repudiate the government's actions of extermination that we continue to live and that are based in the colonial time, which seek us to renounce our most sacred right, the original right to lands, territories and natural resources that we have preserved for thousands of years and that form the basis of our existence, our identity and our ways of life. The current example is the political instrumentalization of the institutions and the breaking of the guarantees of governance of our rights by deliberately dismantling the National Foundation of the Indian. 

We are experiencing a continuous attack by the State on our dignity and wellbeing as indigenous peoples, through the invasion of our indigenous lands. All these actions undermine the integrity of our territories and our future as indigenous peoples.

It is worrisome, the lack of compliance of the States with its obligations with international human rights instruments. As well as the recommendations made by the specialized procedures of the UN and the Universal Periodic Review, all of them aimed at preventing damages and guaranteeing the defense and promotion of the human rights of the indigenous peoples around the world.

The recurrent violation of the rights of indigenous peoples increases the inequality and discrimination suffered by indigenous peoples.   What is happening in Brazil, reflects the experience  of millions  of indigenous peoples  around the world. The defense of our rights is resulting to  persecution, criminalization, and assassinations and other gross human rights violations against our leaders and communities.

For Indigenous Peoples, Goal 16 should be translated into concrete actions the ensure the respect and protection of our rights; and our access to justice. This includes the security and peace in our territories and an end to our criminalization. The international community needs to uphold  its obligation to ensure the  protection of our territories and resources and treat us with respect, dignity and equity to ensure the future of the planet and the people.

 

 

pdf #HLPF2019: DECLARATION OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLES | SDG 16

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DeclaracionINGLES_MARIO_SDG16_v3.pdf

#HLPF2019: DECLARATION OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLES | SDG 16

DECLARATION OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLES

IPMG statement – GOAL 16

I am Mario Nicacio, from the Wapichana indigenous people of the Brazilian Amazonia, I represent 305 indigenous peoples and 274 Brazilian languages. We live in 13% of the Brazilian territory. The current policy of the Bolsonaro government has a clear focus on the violation of our collective rights.

That is why we repudiate the government's actions of extermination that we continue to live and that are based in the colonial time, which seek us to renounce our most sacred right, the original right to lands, territories and natural resources that we have preserved for thousands of years and that form the basis of our existence, our identity and our ways of life. The current example is the political instrumentalization of the institutions and the breaking of the guarantees of governance of our rights by deliberately dismantling the National Foundation of the Indian.

We are experiencing a continuous attack by the State on our dignity and wellbeing as indigenous peoples, through the invasion of our indigenous lands. All these actions undermine the integrity of our territories and our future as indigenous peoples.

It is worrisome, the lack of compliance of the States with its obligations with international human rights instruments. As well as the recommendations made by the specialized procedures of the UN and the Universal Periodic Review, all of them aimed at preventing damages and guaranteeing the defense and promotion of the human rights of the indigenous peoples around the world. 

The recurrent violation of the rights of indigenous peoples increases the inequality and discrimination suffered by indigenous peoples.   What is happening in Brazil, reflects the experience  of millions  of indigenous peoples  around the world. The defense of our rights is resulting to  persecution, criminalization, and assassinations and other gross human rights violations against our leaders and communities. 

For Indigenous Peoples, Goal 16 should be translated into concrete actions the ensure the respect and protection of our rights; and our access to justice. This includes the security and peace in our territories and an end to our criminalization. The international community needs to uphold  its obligation to ensure the  protection of our territories and resources and treat us with respect, dignity and equity to ensure the future of the planet and the people.

 

 

pdf #HLPF2019: Statement on the Session on Financing

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IPMG-statement on Finance -2.pdf

#HLPF2019: Statement on the Session on Financing

High Level Political Forum for Sustainable Development (HLPF 2019) Session on Financing
Statement by the Indigenous Peoples’ Major Group (IPMG)

If we are to advance in the SDG implementation, courage, political will and ACTIONS are needed to tackle the concentration of wealth and power and reverse systemic issues on tax evasion, corruption, unjust trade system and non-accountability of corporations.

The priority for public-private partnerships to drive economic growth targets are causing massive land and resource grabs and pushing indigenous peoples further behind as these are not based on the respect and protection of our rights and social equity. This include renewable energy development that is more profit driven. Financing for basic social services including renewable energy is hardly reaching indigenous peoples particularly those in remote areas.

While indigenous peoples are managing 80% of the global biodiversity, there is little investment to support indigenous peoples to secure their lands and resources, and support for their sustainable livelihoods and self-determined development.

In order for the SDG implementation to be on track with the pledge of leaving no one behind, financing for SDGs should prioritize the needs and priorities of those left behind including indigenous peoples such as on education, health, food security, decent work, among others. Likewise, indigenous peoples should be able to access funds and resources in the spirit of partnerships and collaboration to secure their lands and resources, support their sustainable livelihoods and self-determined development as well as climate actions.

pdf #HLPF2019 Statement on Goal 8: Decent work and economic growth

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Goal 8 Statement_Final.pdf

#HLPF2019 Statement on Goal 8: Decent work and economic growth

Statement on Goal 8: Decent work and economic growth

Indigenous Peoples Major Group (IPMG) 

Governments’ current economic priorities and policies being implemented with “business as usual” approach is adversely affecting decent work of indigenous peoples and are getting marginalized further.

For IPs, decent work implies recognition of our sustainable traditional occupation practices such as farming, seed preservation, shifting cultivation, hunting, fishing and transmission of indigenous knowledge, etc.These occupations contribute to enriching their livelihood security, cultural diversity, strengthening social relations and institutions. Therefore, their traditional occupation is an integral part of their identity and dignitywhich needs to be protected and integrated in the implementation of the SDGs with the pledge of leaving no one behind.

There are number of factors hindering or putting pressure in the protection and promotion of traditional occupations and some of these are:

  • Government laws and regulations in various countries that are aimed at preventing or phasing out traditional occupations such as shifting cultivation and thereby criminalizing these activities.
  • The economic growth targets and programmes are posing greater threat to our decent life and work as it further undermines our rights and traditional occupations. The Association of Southeast Asian Nations’ (ASEAN) investment plans are focused on dams and extractive industries such as large-scale mining, which are mostly located in indigenous peoples’ territories. The infrastructure development plans include more than 100 large hydropower dams and major highways for ASEAN connectivity. These projects are causing conflicts resulting from displacements and outright disregard for indigenous peoples’ rights to their lands, territories and resources.
  • Corporate agribusiness expansion plans for oil palm, corn production and sugar plantations are resulting in land grabbing and devastation of the economic base of indigenous peoples at a large-scale in many countries.

Further, the main targets for various “economic growth,” projects are in indigenous territories, but they have the least access to basic social services such as education and health services, etc.

It is important to note that,much evidence indicates that our traditional occupations include sustainable food systems and agro-ecological farming approaches that combine indigenous knowledge with multi-disciplinary scienceoffer sustainable solutions to the problems of environment and healthy food.

We Recommend the following:

  • Ensure legal recognition of indigenous peoples’ lands, territories and resources and their traditional occupations.
  • Stop criminalization and fully protect traditional occupations as decent work, including providing appropriate basic social services.
  • Ensure the Free, Prior and Informed Consent of indigenous peoples regarding economic growth projects, plans and programmes affecting them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

pdf #HLPF2019 Statement of the Indigenous Peoples Major Group Session on Least Developing Countries (Spanish)

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IPMG Statement- LDC Spanish.pdf

#HLPF2019 Statement of the Indigenous Peoples Major Group Session on Least Developing Countries (Spanish)

Gracias señor Presidenta. El Grupo Mayor de Pueblos Indígenas expresa su preocupación por el aumento de los estados autoritarios y la dominación del poder político en los países menos desarrollados, Asia, América Latina y África. Esto está estableciendo límites a la participación significativa de la sociedad civil, incluidos los pueblos indígenas, en la implementación de los ODS. En su búsqueda por lograr el crecimiento económico, se implementan grandes proyectos de infraestructura en territorios indígenas sin consultas y consentimiento libre previo e informado de los pueblos indígenas.Esto, está dando lugar a violaciones masivas de los derechos humanos y las libertades fundamentales, incluido el acceso a la información, la libertad de expresión y reunión y la falta de acceso a la justicia. El informe de la Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos indicaba que al menos 20 líderes indígenas han sido asesinados en Guatemala en 2018, en gran parte activistas que defendían sus tierras, territorios y otros derechos. Solo en Camboya, en 2018, 34 defensores de derechos humanos indígenas, incluidas 12 mujeres, fueron encarcelados por casos de incitación al gobierno, destrucción de propiedad privada, robo y otros cargos penales como respuesta a las acciones legítimas de las comunidades indígenas para defender sus derecho a la tierra contra concesiones de tierras. En Kenia, en diciembre de 2018, 35 defensores y defensoras de los derechos humanos impugnaron la implementación de proyectos de mega infraestructura y fueron sometidos a arrestos y detenciones arbitrarias, violencia física y amenazas por parte de la policía y el personal militar de Kenia.

Estos casos representan el empeoramiento del entorno político que no está alineado con los principios del desarrollo inclusivo y sostenible y es contrario al compromiso de no dejar a nadie atrás en la implementación de los ODS. Además, los pueblos indígenas están contribuyendo al desarrollo sostenible con sus estilos de vida bajos en producción de carbono y a la gestión sostenible de los recursos, pero son tratados como no desarrollados y contrarios al mismo y son perseguidos cuando defienden sus tierras y recursos contra los proyectos destructivos que se les imponen en nombre del desarrollo sostenible. .

Por lo tanto, es imperativo que se garantice la participación democrática basada en el respeto de los derechos humanos, incluidos los derechos colectivos de los pueblos indígenas, a fin de subsanar las deficiencias y lograr avances en la implementación de los ODS. Los actores del desarrollo, incluidos los inversores y las empresas, también deben respetar los derechos humanos de conformidad con los Principios Rectores de las Naciones Unidas sobre Empresas y Derechos Humanos. Las violaciones de los derechos humanos, incluidos los derechos colectivos de los derechos de los pueblos indígenas, no pueden ser una excusa para alcanzar los objetivos de crecimiento económico para lograr un desarrollo sostenible en los países menos desarrollados, y la responsabilidad del estado para con sus ciudadanos, en particular para aquellos que se encuentran atrás o más débiles, deben fortalecerse.

document #HLPF2019 Statement of the Indigenous Peoples Major Group Session on Least Developing Countries (English)

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IPMG Statement English.docx

#HLPF2019 Statement of the Indigenous Peoples Major Group Session on Least Developing Countries (English)

High Level Political Forum for Sustainable Development 2019

 

Statement of the Indigenous Peoples Major Group

 

Session on Least Developing Countries

  

The Indigenous Peoples Major Group expressed its concern on the  increasing authoritarian states and domination of elite political power in least developing countries across Asia, Latin America and Africa. This is setting limitations to the meaningful participation of civil society including indigenous peoples in the SDG implementation.  In their pursuit to achieve economic growth, large infrastructure projects are implemented in indigenous territories without meaningful consultations and consent of indigenous peoples.  Further, it is resulting  to the massive violations of fundamental human rights and freedoms, including access to information, freedom of  expression and assembly  and lack of access to Justice.  The Report of the  Inter-American Commission on Human Rights indicated that at least 20 indigenous leaders had been murdered in Guatemala in 2018, largely activists defending their lands, territories and other rights. In Cambodia  in 2018 alone, 34 indigenous Human Rights Defenders  including 12 women had been jailed with cases of incitement against the government, destruction of private property, theft/robbery and other criminal charges as a response to the legitimate actions of indigenous communities in defending their lands against economic land concessions. In Kenya, in December 2018,  35 human rights defenders challenging the implementation of mega-infrastructure projects  were subjected to arbitrary arrest and detention, physical violence and threats by the Kenyan police and military personnel.

These cases represent the worsening  political environment  that is not aligned to principles of inclusive  and sustainable development and contrary to the pledge of leaving no one behind in the implementation of the SDGs. Further, indigenous peoples are contributing to sustainable development with their  low carbon lifestyles, and sustainable management of resources, but are treated as anti-development and persecuted when they defend their lands and resources against destructive projects being imposed on them in the name of sustainable development.   

It is thereby imperative that democratic participation based on the respect for human rights, including the collective rights of indigenous peoples should be guaranteed in order to address the gaps and achieve progress in the implementation of the SDGs.  Development actors including investors and businesses should also respect human rights in accordance with the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights.  Violations of human rights including  the collective rights of indigenous peoples rights cannot be an excuse to reach economic growth targets to achieve sustainable development in least developing countries, and state’s accountability to its citizens, particularly to those left behind needs to be strengthened. 

 

 

 

pdf #HLPF2019 STATEMENT OF THE INDIGENOUS PEOPLES MAJOR GROUP | GOAL 4: Quality Education for all

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IPMG on Goal 4- Quality education.pdf

#HLPF2019 STATEMENT OF THE INDIGENOUS PEOPLES MAJOR GROUP | GOAL 4: Quality Education for all

High Level Political Forum for Sustainable Development ( HLPF) 2019

STATEMENT OF THE INDIGENOUS PEOPLES MAJOR GROUP (IPMG) GOAL 4: Quality Education for all

The Indigenous peoples wish to acknowledge the efforts of states and other development actors in providing access to education to indigenous peoples and other marginalized groups including narrowing the gap on education between boys and girls. While there is a significant progress on Goal 4, majority of indigenous peoples in rural areas continue to face discrimination in terms of access to quality and appropriate education. At the primary level, mother tongue education for indigenous children is not given the needed support, particularly the widespread initiatives of indigenous institutions and organizations. The inter-generational transfer of indigenous knowledge to the younger generation is not valued and even criminalized in many cases as this knowledge is intertwined with the livelihood activities of indigenous peoples which are prohibited or restricted. Likewise, educational curricula and programmes are not gender and culture- sensitive and thus reinforcing discriminatory views and attitude to indigenous peoples. Access to higher education remains a major challenge to indigenous peoples due to high cost, proximity and prevailing discriminatory practices including in provision of scholarships.

Further, the widespread conflicts in indigenous territories such as in Africa, Latin America and Asia are disrupting and undermining the education of indigenous children and youth, and are increasing their vulnerabilities to violence and abuse including sexual abuse to indigenous women and girls. The interlinkages of poverty, conflicts, discrimination and lack of access to appropriate education are major obstacles in developing the skills, capacities, and potential of indigenous children and youth as the future leaders of indigenous peoples.

In order to further advance the implementation of Goal 4 under the pledge of leaving no onebehind, the Indigenous Peoples’ Major Group thereby recommends the following

  1. States to develop targeted plans and programmes to reach those furthest behind in relation to access to education, and ensure the inclusion of indigenous peoples; and to develop and implement culture-sensitive curriculum including the use of indigenous languages at the primary level in collaboration with indigenous educators and leaders.

  2. States to prioritize effective access to quality education of marginalized groups including indigenous children and youth in both urban and rural areas through allocation of sufficient resources, development of appropriate infrastructure and services, and training of teachers among others.

  3. States and other actors to Immediately resolve conflicts in indigenous territories in line with respecting the rights of indigenous peoples and provide security to indigenous children and youth.

4. States and development actors to develop and strengthen partnerships with indigenous institutions and organizations support their efforts and initiatives for mother-tongue education, intergenerational transfer of indigenous knowledge and appropriate life-skills development for indigenous children and youth

pdf Statement of the Indigenous Peoples Major Group (IPMG) at #HLPF2019: WHO IS AT RISK TO BE LEFT BEHIND

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IPMG Statement- July 9 , 11-30 session.pdf

Statement of  the Indigenous Peoples Major Group (IPMG) at #HLPF2019: WHO IS AT RISK TO BE LEFT BEHIND

High Level Political Forum (HLPF 2019 

Statement of the Indigenous Peoples Major Group (IPMG)

July 9, 2019

 

WHO IS AT RISK TO BE LEFT BEHIND

As we are now in the 4thyear  for the SDG implementation, Indigenous Peoples need concrete and targeted actions on the ground in line with the pledge of leaving no one behind:

  1. For States to fully implement their human rights obligations including the recognition and protection of the right to land, territories and resources of indigenous peoples
  2. For States to establish effective mechanisms for sustained engagement, participation and inclusion of indigenous peoples; develop  and implement appropriate measure and programmes to address their specific needs including indigenous women and their aspirations for sustainable development with sufficient resources; and to conduct data -disaggregation by sex and ethnicity
  3. For UN agencies, funds and programs  as well as other development actors to strengthen their efforts to reach out to indigenous peoples at all levels and  establish partnerships to support their self-determined development and wellbeing under a rights-based approach to sustainable development 

There are more than 370 million indigenous peoples  which is 5 % of the global population but 15 % of the poorest.  In particular indigenous women experience multiple layers of discrimination as women and as indigenous peoples. The intersection of gender, ethnicity and poverty  renders them more vulnerable to oppression, exploitation, abuse and violence due to the prevalence of patriarchal system   and the continuing violations of indigenous peoples’ collective rights. The overwhelming reality of discrimination of and continued violence faced by indigenous women in particular and of indigenous peoples in general illustrates that they are extremely lagging behind in achieving the SDGs.  The increasing land dispossession including forced eviction of indigenous peoples, the alarming incidents of criminalization of indigenous men and women, and the increasing conflicts and violence in indigenous territories; and the lack of access to justice  are all  contrary to the pledge of leaving no one behind and are even pushing them behind.

While indigenous peoples manage 80 % of the global biodiversity with their conservation and sustainable resource management systems of which indigenous women play a vital role, this is not  fully taken into account in ensuring that the they protected and supported.  In fact, indigenous peoples continue to be sacrificed directly  or taken as collateral damage when states and business pursue their economic development plans without regard to the rights and wellbeing of indigenous peoples including indigenous women.  The business as usual and top down approach  remain dominant in the implementation of the SDGs which is only worsening the inequality, exclusion and discrimination of indigenous peoples with disproportionate impacts to indigenous women.

 

pdf IPMG Statement on the Regional Road Map during the APFSD 2019 Popular

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Regional Road Map-JC-FINAL.pdf

IPMG Statement on the Regional Road Map during the APFSD 2019
Statement on the Regional Road Map Joan Carling Indigenous Peoples' Major Group The Indigenous Peoples Major Group (IPMG) welcomes the Regional Road Map Report on the SDGs. Under the theme of " leaving no one behind" the reports states "Despite high and enduring economic growth and significant progress in terms of poverty eradication, inequality persists in the Asia-Pacific region, and in some instances has intensified. Growing disparities in income and wealth, as well as inequality of opportunity, disproportionately affect women and vulnerable groups". At the same time, the report also refers to encouraging progress in terms of implementing thirty-six global means of implementation targets in the leaving no one behind priority area of cooperation. What we believe as areas for improvement in the report is also to provide the underlying factors on the growing disparities in income, wealth and inequality of opportunities among others. Addressing the underlying factors and barriers should then be included as recommendations in advancing the SDGs and not limited to accelerating implementation of the other targets. We also wish to draw attention to the continuing general reference to vulnerable groups as those left behind. Unless we clearly identify these groups and ensure the protection of their rights, as well as their meaningful participation in designing specific measures and programmes to address their specific conditions, needs and priorities, we will not be able to achieve the overarching goal of leaving no one behind. Participatory monitoring and reporting with data-disaggregation by sex, age, ethnicity and abilities is needed to measure gaps and progress on their inclusion. For Indigenous peoples across the region, we insist that we need to be identified as indigenous peoples and not just part of the vulnerable group. 2/3 of the world's indigenous peoples of more than 400 million are in Asia, majority remains poor, and our rights are systematically violated particularly our rights to our lands and resources which are targeted for economic growth and development. We are even criminalized when we defend our rights, and we have no access to justice. These are the underlying factors of why we are not just left behind but are being pushed behind further. At the same time, our contributions to sustainable development thru conservation and sustainable resource management among others are not acknowledged and are even undermined. We thereby urgently request a regional mechanism to identify those left behind and to address their specific concerns and inclusion in the SDGs thru the regional roadmap process. In particular, this regional mechanism should provide avenues for those left behind to present their views and report in terms of gaps, progress and challenges in their inclusion in achieving the SDGs under the theme of leaving no one behind as one of the priority areas of the regional roadmap. Thank you for your attention.

pdf IPMG Statement at Global Land Forum 2018 Popular

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Global Land Forum 2018 Nairobi Gertrude Presentation.pdf

IPMG Statement at Global Land Forum 2018

Download the document to read IPMG's Statement presented at the Global Land Forum held in Nairobi.

pdf IPMG Statement on Colombia Popular

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IPMGS tatement on Colombia.pdf

The Indigenous Peoples Major Group on the SDGs stands in solidarity with the indigenous peoples of Colombia and strongly condemns the persistent and gross human rights violations committed against them in the country.

While Colombia presented its Voluntary National Report (VNR) on its implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals at the current session of the HLPF session in New York, the National Indigenous Organization of Colombia (ONIC) issued a statement denouncing the continuous and systematic violation of the rights of indigenous peoples in Colombia which is pushing them further behind.

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pdf IPMG Statement on SDG 6 - Sustainable management of water and sanitation for all Popular

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Goal 6_statement_HLPF_2018.pdf

Statement of the Indigenous Peoples Major Group (IPMG) 

Unsustainable development practices such as excessive extraction, diversion and damming of major water systems, have disproportionately impacted Indigenous peoples. Often times these activities are facilitated by the forced displacement of Indigenous Peoples, and the loss of ecological habitats important for their resilient economies and lifeways. Industrial pollution of watersheds threaten, or have already destroyed, what remains of water resources within Indigenous lands and territories; in many cases carrying intergenerational impacts as exposure to contaminated water affects the reproductive health of Indigenous women. These activities result in the continued cultural, physical and ethnic genocide of Indigenous Peoples. As such, Indigenous Peoples around the globe continue to find their communities on the frontlines in the struggle for access to, and protection of, clean drinking water, while also leading in the development of integrated and holistic management of finite freshwater ecosystems to foster sustainable and resilient societies.

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pdf IPMG STATEMENT ON THE MEANS OF IMPLEMENTATION: GOAL 17 Popular

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MEANS OF IMPLEMENTATION-Goal 17-2.pdf

 UN High Level Political Forum

Un Headquarters in New York

July 9-18,2018

IPMG STATEMENT ON THE MEANS OF IMPLEMENTATION: GOAL 17

The means of implementation should take into account the historical and unjust plunder of indigenous peoples lands, territories and resources of indigenous peoples, which is one of the main reason why we are marginalized and furthest left behind. Colonization and corporate greed have bled us   and disempowered us from being stewards of the planet for the future generation. The historical debt of industrialized nations and corporations to indigenous peoples within their countries and in their former colonies warrant decisive actions for just compensation, restitution and regeneration through the provision of adequate financial and other forms of appropriate resources and accountability to indigenous peoples to address this historical legacy.

Further, indigenous peoples are systematically discriminated in having adequate and appropriate social services such as education, health, energy, basic infrastructures, housing and employment which are the obligations of states to its citizens. We thereby recommend for the allocation of adequate funds and resources and engagement with indigenous peoples for participatory planning and to develop specific and targeted measure to ensure that indigenous peoples are not left behind. 

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pdf SDG 11 – Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable Popular

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Statement-SDG11.pdf

IPMG Statement:

SDG 11 – Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable

Today, there are approximately 370 million Indigenous Peoples living in 90 countries worldwide. Indigenous Peoples constitute about 5% of the world population yet are overrepresented in almost every poor measure of modern life. In settled nations such as Australia, Canada and the United States, the majority – as much as 71% - live in metropolitan areas.

Whether through displacement, migration or settler intrusion on our homelands, Indigenous people have been separated from country and each other.

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pdf VNR REPORT MALI HLPF 2018 Popular

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VRN-REPORT-MALI-HLPF-2018.pdf

This is the VNR report of Mali from the perspective of indigenous peoples.

In our opinion, all of the SDGs are at a very low level of implementation in Mali, and in most cases almost zero in many parts of the country, particularly in the North and Center. It is in these regions that the majority of the indigenous communities in Mali and/or vulnerable pastoral communities live. Access to school due to insecurity is on a very worrying scale, especially for girls who experience forced and early marriages due to the resistance cultural barriers.

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pdf IPMG Statement on SDG 15: Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss Popular

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IPMG_Statement_SDG15.pdf

Review of the SDG Implementation

SDG 15 - Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss

Statement from the Indigenous Peoples’ Major Group 

 

pdf RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE VNR OF COUNTRIES IN LATIN AMERICA Popular

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VNR recommendations- Latin America.pdf

These are the recommendations for the Voluntary National Review of the countries in Latin America specifically the following:

Colombia

Ecuador

Paraguay

Mexico

Download the document to read the review > English

Checkout the Spanish version here > FILAC

 

pdf IPMG Statement on Goal 12: Responsible Production & Consumption at #HLPF2018 Popular

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IPMG statement on Goal 12.pdf

STATEMENT OF THE INDIGENOUS PEOPLES MAJOR GROUP 

GOAL 12:  Responsible Production and Consumption

Indigenous peoples across the globe are keepers of lands, territories and resources which they have conserve and manage sustainably for our collective survival and for the future generation. Indigenous Peoples’ have the least carbon footprint and our ecological economies thrive with our practice of sustainable traditional occupations that also embodies our diverse cultures, identities and distinct ways of life. Our production and consumption system is guided by our values of sharing, mutual cooperation, reciprocity and conservation and regeneration for the future generation.

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Statement for Interactive Dialogue – SDG 7 Event

The Indigenous Peoples Major Group to the SDGs would like to make a contribution to this discussion, and call for stronger rights-based policies related to SDG 7.

While representing only 5% of the global population, indigenous peoples make up a staggering one third of the world’s 900 million extremely poor rural people. Given that the rural poor form the bulk of those without access to energy, indigenous people are a critical demographic that needs to be put at the centre of the global dialogue on energy if SDG 7 on ensuring access to energy for all is to be achieved. 

Despite this fact, indigenous peoples suffer invisibility when it comes to energy access. There is little disaggregated data on indigenous peoples’ access to. Major reports from initiatives aligned with SDG 7 either don’t mention, or only superficially refer to, indigenous peoples and fail to examine their unique challenges as a distinct group. 

At the same time, indigenous territories host renewable energy projects without meaningful consultation and consent by indigenous peoples and in violation to their rights to their lands and resources. These projects have resulted in conflicts, displacements, destruction of livelihoods, and have violated indigenous peoples’ rights and undermined their self-determined development. Those who have spoken out against these projects have at times been threatened or murdered. 

It is thereby imperative that the implementation of Goal 7 is guided by clear policies on the respect and protection of human rights, ensure equitable benefits for communities, and mechanisms for participation and inclusion of indigenous peoples and marginalized groups in the planning (including decision-making), implementation and monitoring. This will also ensure that the interlinkages of Goal 7 with other Goals for positive outcomes will be achieved such as Goals 1,2, 5, 10, 13, 17 among others in the context of “ leaving no one behind”.

Thus, activities to implement SDG 7 affecting indigenous peoples should adhere to existing international human rights laws and norms relating to indigenous peoples. The two main international instruments that explicitly define indigenous peoples’ rights under international law, the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) and the ILO Convention No. 169, should guide sustainable energy related activities.

Given these significant challenges and also opportunities, the Indigenous Peoples’ Major Group on the SDGs is developing an indigenous peoples-led and rights-based the multi-stakeholder partnership called Right Energy Partnership (REP) with indigenous peoples in order to:

  • Empower indigenous communities in their self-determined sustainable development, through access to appropriate renewable energy ensuring equitable and inclusive benefits for communities
  • Ensure the protection of rights to prevent the adverse impacts of renewable energy development on indigenous communities; and
  • Strengthen knowledge exchange, solidarity and collaboration between indigenous peoples and other actors to contribute towards the goals of the Partnership.

We call on actors in the room today to join us in this innovative and rights-based partnership to achieve Goal 7 and related goals in achieving sustainable development for indigenous peoples in line with the pledge of “leaving no one behind”.

We would be happy to share more information,  and invite you to a consultation on the Partnership that will take place on Thursday 19 April between 1:15-2:30 in Conference Room S-2725 BR on the 27th Floor.

 

Contact person:

Joan Carling

Focal Person/Convenor

Indigenous Peoples Major Group for Sustainable Development

Website: www.indigenouspeoples-sdg.org

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

 

 

Connect with us

IPMG Organizing Partners

Tebtebba
1 Roman Ayson Road, Baguio City 2600, Philippines
Tel. No. +63 74 444-7703 / Tex Fax +63 74 443-9459
Website: www.tebtebba.org
Email: tebtebba@tebtebba.org

International Indian Treaty Council
2940 16th Street, Suite 305, San Francisco, CA 94103, USA
Website: www.iitc.org
Email: info@treatycouncil.org

This initiative is being implemented with funding by the European Union.

 

Indigenous Peoples Major Group for Sustainable Development © Copyright 2019.

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